Posted in Quilts

Space Nerd Remix

Just a quick log cabin this week to use up all those science and space novelty prints from the commissioned Space Nerd Quilt. I added some solids and blenders so I would have enough to make a very large twin quilt. I cut 3 1/2 inch squares of the white constellations print (Lizzy House Whisper Palette) for the centers and then all the blocks are 3 1/2” wide (by 6 1/2, 9 1/2, 12 1/2). Because I decided to make them all square in the end, I cut the 15 1/2 inch strips after the blocks were otherwise complete, which actually made laying it out easier, as I didn’t have the same fabrics end up adjacent very often.

 
No fabric ended up in the same block twice (I think) and very few adjacent. This ended up as a very large twin (~75” x 90”), or double. And the blocks were all so large, it came together at top speed. Fun scrap buster. 

Posted in Quilts, Works in Progress

Rapid City Space Quilt

I got a request for a twin-sized quilt for a boy who loved all things Outer Space. But of course, it couldn’t be that simple. The requester, who would be gifting this quilt to said boy, prefers bright saturated colors and so would need those incorporated among the space-themed fabrics. And “space-themed” needed to include rockets.

Once we had settled on a pattern and I had acquired some fabrics (including some overt, novelty rocket fabrics — not my general fave), an additional AND was given: AND the boy’s favorite color is orange and so that has to be included.

All these parameters just serve to make me feel like a dynamic and flexible quilt maker though. I love just making it work.

So, the pattern I settled on was the Rapid City quilt pattern by Elizabeth Hartman, from her book, Modern Patchwork: 12 Quilts to Take You Beyond the Basics. I am just fresh off making a queen sized version of one of her other patterns, New Wave, and I gotta say, Elizabeth Hartman is a quilt pattern writing genius. This book is a great investment. The patterns look very complicated, and they usually do require a full day dedicated solely to cutting up the fabric and labeling the pieces, but the end results are always worth it. And in every pattern I’ve seen of hers, she breaks down the process so sensibly, from cutting in the most efficient/ least wasteful manner, to choosing fabrics and colors in a way that will make each quilt unique and mod and unified.

This pattern suggests using 8 prints and 8 coordinating solids. She has fully converted me to incorporating solids into every quilt, ever since taking her Craftsy class on modern quilts. But I did sneak one blender into my coordinating choices. So 8 space-themed prints, 7 solids (including orange, of course), and some cobalt blue Sprinkle from Cotton + Steel.

Last week, I spent one full day cutting and labeling pieces as dictated by the pattern, and then the blocks came together quickly (as her patterns usually do because of all the intense preparation). Today will be dedicated to piecing the top together, maybe getting as far as basting and starting the quilting. My hope is to finish this entirely by this weekend, when I will be seeing the purchaser, so I can hand deliver her final products.

One pieced block (of 16 total):

Fabrics are Kona Ash and Black, prints from Lizzy House’s Natural History Collection, astronauts and space shuttles from Makower Galaxy collection, which are really adorable in these small amounts.

Posted in Quilts

The Meadow Quilt: a year-long journey

I didn’t actually realize it until I typed this post title JUST NOW, but this meadow quilt was a journey of almost exactly one year. (Yes, i do realize ‘almost exactly’ is an oxymoron. I am super clever.)

But looking through my phone, I found these photos that I took at the Meadow Quilt workshop taught by Lizzy House herself with the San Diego Modern Quilt Guild on March 6, 2016.

Aren’t we all so cute? And it was a year ago, so we are all aglow with youth, too.

Then I scrolled forward to the photos of the nearly finished Meadow Quilt, with its adorable intended recipients. The photo says it was taken March 4, 2017, and I’m inclined to believe it. You’ll notice it wasn’t yet bound (I simply surged up the edges on my serger, a practice I have come to love), and I bound it a day or two later, so it was very probably on March 6!


I ended up binding it with Elizabeth Hartman Starlight in gray, from the Paintbox Basics collection (or maybe Pacific?) to complement the Cotton & Steel sprinkle stardust that I used as a background fabric on the top, and the extra wide backing that I used on the back, which is Elizabeth Hartman wide back, like a swollen and darkened version of that binding fabric. I love this wideback fabric so much, I had to stock up on it, in both the gray and the hot pink color. So you’ll be seeing more soon. I just love how quirky and cartoonish it is. It makes every quilt look more modern and fun.

And in between that first photo and that last photo, what happened during the 364 days in between? Well, sewing, obviously. But also, some meditative time on a long-arm quilting machine. I used the giant Bernina Q24 at Cozy Creative Center to stitch the twinkle lights pattern in the background and used my Juki to stitch a variegated pink thread onto the pink sections. The main contributor to all that delicious texture is for sure the wool batting. I used this Quilters Dream Wool Batting (93” x 72”) Twin, and I just can’t recommend it enough. Especially for a kid’s quilt that will be used year-round. It makes for a very functional comforter in addition to being a beautifully draped word of quilted art.

img_1546img_1511

This quilt journey was my first exposure to curved piecing, which has created great confidence in my piecing abilities, and was a joy from start to finish. That’s 365 days of joy. And counting.

Posted in Quilts

Adventures with the Longarm

I finally took a longarm class in order to rent time on a longarm machine at The Quilted Rose, here in San Diego. I would now like to offer up my right kidney to the highest bidder so that I can purchase a longarm machine and use it everyday. The machines at TQR are pretty old and huge, and when I rented time, they actually gave me the clunkiest one. I was not super pleased about that, but it did not deter me from longarm quilting in the slightest. It just made me google my other San Diego county options. 

So my pieced quilt began with the central fairies fabric which is an out of print Alexander Henry print that I had no idea what to do with, but loved intensely and purchased from an etsy seller that specializes in out of print goodies. Then after our guild (SDMQG) did a Lizzy House challenge during Lizzy house’s visit, I was inspired by my fellow runner up (yes! I was totally a runner up!) and her Unicornio quilt. It was a large scale log cabin with a variety of colors and featuring a Lizzy house unicorn right smack dab in the center.

So I have been adding rich log cabin walls around these mysterious fairies slowly slowly slowly. 

   
   Then I spent some time with it at TQR, choosing a very intense teal thread for the quilting, and bound it in deep green Constellations by Lizzy House. 

If you look closely at the quilting, you’ll see that I basically tried everything I had practiced on paper from An Angela Walters book that I have, Shape by Shape. And it’s very beginner, but again, that machine was a rickety pile, so I am not totally to blame. And the prints are so busy, it doesn’t matter at all. I see it as a longarm sampler for me, and my daughter loves it on her bottom bunk (for when friends come to sleep over, she tells me). It couldn’t possibly go on the top bunk because, speaking of Lizzy House, that spot is reserved for the forthcoming Meadow Quilt (top is already complete!)